What's For Dinner?

Cooking at home and sourcing ingredients
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Skillet Doux
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Oh, wait, I'm looking at the photo... you meant the limes themselves! That IS a find. Where the heck did you get those?!
Dominic Armato
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Tim H
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Skillet Doux wrote:Oh, wait, I'm looking at the photo... you meant the limes themselves! That IS a find. Where the heck did you get those?!
My wife got them from her sister in California. We have two kaffir lime trees that are about four years old, but they have yet to fruit. But just the leaves are miraculous in Thai curries and soups.
There is nothing either good or bad but gravy makes it so. - Kevin Hearne
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Skillet Doux
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Ahhhh, California connection. Should've guessed :-)

That's pretty exciting. Agreed on the leaves -- those are some magical, irreplaceable little fellows. But I've never even held the fruit. Neat.
Dominic Armato
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grrlscout
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Skillet Doux wrote: FYI, I use kaffir lime leaf when I make Beef Rendang, and I've always had good luck finding it at Lee Lee in Chandler. They seem to carry it pretty consistently.
My neighborhood Thai restaurant has kaffir lime trees planted by their parking lot. ;)
~ Korina
gardener | forager | permie | maker of things
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Skillet Doux
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grrlscout wrote:
Skillet Doux wrote: FYI, I use kaffir lime leaf when I make Beef Rendang, and I've always had good luck finding it at Lee Lee in Chandler. They seem to carry it pretty consistently.
My neighborhood Thai restaurant has kaffir lime trees planted by their parking lot. ;)
I'll get my balaclava.
Dominic Armato
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Skillet Doux
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I am a sucker for deviled eggs. In particular, I am especially a sucker for the "Spicy Asian" genre of deviled eggs -- curry, wasabi, sriracha, etc. So it's 2:00 AM, I have leftover Easter eggs, I'm waffling between curry and wasabi and sriracha, and I think, well, so many of those dishes have eggs in 'em... why not gochujang?
Korean Deviled Eggs
Korean Deviled Eggs
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Quite possibly my favorite of all. I didn't measure anything, but I used Kewpie mayonnaise for the base, added very finely minced onion, celery, and apple, then spiced it up with a spoonful of gochujang, a splash of rice vinegar, and tiny little drizzles of honey and sesame oil. Seriously, absurdly delicious.
Dominic Armato
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golbsalt
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what's the garnish stick on top of the egg?
blog.golbsalt.com - "happiness IS just a lick away!"
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Skillet Doux
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Apple.
Dominic Armato
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Tim H
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Those deviled eggs look really good. I hope you had braunschweiger on saltines somewhere nearby.
There is nothing either good or bad but gravy makes it so. - Kevin Hearne
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Tim H
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I recently had a revelation in pork belly via YouTube. It may be obvious to some, but it wasn't to me. Normally, I sear and then braise a pork belly only to end up with flabby skin that presents a problem.

The method in the video skipped the initial sear. It started with the braise, then weighed the belly down while chilling it in the fridge. You end up with perfectly flat skin on the belly, which (when chilled) you can easily portion and roast as needed. Start it skin-side down in a hot non-stick skillet and finish in the same skillet in a 375 oven for 15 to 20 minutes until the skin is crispy. You get beautifully portioned braised pork belly WITH crispy crackling. This may be SOP for kitchen professionals, but man I hate to think of the skin I've wasted for not knowing….
Braised pork belly with crackling
Braised pork belly with crackling
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Next night: Taco filling... with crackling
Next night: Taco filling... with crackling
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Pork belly taco with homemade kimchi... and crackling
Pork belly taco with homemade kimchi... and crackling
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There is nothing either good or bad but gravy makes it so. - Kevin Hearne
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Mike Z
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Healthy weekend breakfast. Brat on a bolio with boxed cheesy scalloped potatoes, green onions, and doctored black beans. Because that makes sense, right? It’s so wrong it’s right. Thinking of opening a restaurant called WWED . . . What Would Elvis Do
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Brat on a bolio with boxed cheesy scalloped potatoes, green onions, and doctored black beans
Brat on a bolio with boxed cheesy scalloped potatoes, green onions, and doctored black beans
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Tim H
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The ramen discussions on the restaurant forum led me to try two bowls of ramen in southeast valley restaurants, and both were disappointing. (One was a tonkotsu ramen with so little flavor that I wasn't surprised when the waitress explained: "They mix powder with hot water." Should have asked beforehand.)

So I made David Chang's ramen broth from Mind of a Chef again; takes some time but easy to do (see 11:40 mark at http://video.pbs.org/video/2299820860/). After steeping the kombu and shiitakes, I used the remains of a Costco roast chicken and a bag of pork bones from Lee Lee's. You know how chicken stock gets jiggly when chilled? This stuff you can cut with a knife.

I made a simplified version of the seasoning sauce (tare): reduced a cup of the broth to 1/3 cup and added 1/3 cup usukuchi soy sauce and 1/4 cup mirin. Chang says the broth should be just shy of being too salty, and I used a about half a cup of the tare to get to that point for a single bowl of soup. The noodles (the fresh bagged noodles from Lee Lee's) were the only letdown, but still glad I made the effort. Good soup.
ramen_broth.JPG
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This is just as I'm adding the bones and aromatics. The stock gets this dark from the kombu and dried shiitake. You could make a really good vegetarian broth at this point without the bones.
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Pork braised in stock and soy sauce with star anise, then briefly roasted. Wish I'd roasted it longer.
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Toppings: pork belly, marinated mushrooms (used to make the broth), scallions, and pickled ginger. A quarter teaspoon of sesame oil as well.
There is nothing either good or bad but gravy makes it so. - Kevin Hearne
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Skillet Doux
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Ramen seems to be on everybody's brain :-)

I'm going to toot ScottofStrand's horn for him.
scottramen.jpg
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Whoa. Kotteri to the extreme. Rich chicken and pork stock, soy and toasted sesame tare (probably more I missed), scallions, cabbage, two kinds of luscious pork, salty daikon pickles with a touch of turmeric, delicious fresh noodles, and an egg that just melted away into the bowl. Seriously, one of the best bowls of ramen I've had in the city of Phoenix, and far more delicious/ambitious than um... some others getting national attention. Thanks, Scott :-)
Dominic Armato
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Tim H
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And plated like a work of art. Beautiful work, Scott.
There is nothing either good or bad but gravy makes it so. - Kevin Hearne
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BarbaraToombs
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And you were treated to this, Dom??? Some people have all the luck... ;-)
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ScottofStrand
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Dom was in the test group! I plan on having a full-on PFN Ramen night sometime soon! I'm pretty happy with the way everything turned out, but i'm already busy pickling some ginger and daikon in larger batches for next run. The noodles were the biggest hurdle, but now that I have them figured out, it's go time!
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MyLifeOnVacatio
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Wow, that looks like a very serious bowl of ramen. Great job, Scott!
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Skillet Doux
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Oh, gosh, we've let this thread go dormant for far too long.

I picked up some pretty good-looking cod a few weeks ago, I was just kind of screwing around, and somehow stumbled into one of the best things I've ever made:
Roasted Cod with Preserved Lemon, Olive, and Pistachio
Roasted Cod with Preserved Lemon, Olive, and Pistachio
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The puree is celery root, just simmered in milk for a while and taken on a trip through the blender with some of the milk and a little butter, S&P. I started roasting the asparagus, and about halfway through laid the seasoned cod on top, then topped the cod with a drizzle of oil and some roughly chopped preserved lemon and castelvetrano olives. I roasted it pretty hot, and when it was done, I plated it over the celery root puree, gave it a tiny squeeze of fresh lemon, and dusted it with some pistachio that I'd toasted and ground in a mortar.

Make this.
Dominic Armato
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Tim H
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I smoked a tri tip at 215° just seasoned with salt and pepper and a couple pinches of garlic powder to go Santa Maria style. Took it off the smoker at 127° and seared it on a cast iron skillet.

The purpose of this was solely to chill it and slice it thin for sandwiches this week, but I ate nearly half of it right off the cutting board. What a lovely cut of meat.

The sandwich condiments were garlic mayo and onion jam (recipe for the jam taken from the Craftwich roast turkey sandwich, but with red wine vinegar instead of balsamic and less sugar -- one of my favorite condiments at the moment). Pretty tasty.
Smoked tri tip
Smoked tri tip
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Tri tip sandwich with garlic mayo and onion jam
Tri tip sandwich with garlic mayo and onion jam
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There is nothing either good or bad but gravy makes it so. - Kevin Hearne
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Skillet Doux
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I really need to spend more time with tri-tip. That looks beautiful.

Incidentally, did anybody ever find a place that sells it with the cap?
Dominic Armato