Sous Vide Cookery at Home

Cooking at home and sourcing ingredients
M_L
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I just put a cooling rack or two on a half sheet.
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Skillet Doux
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Loving the Searzall so far. I see complaints about it being underpowered online, but that wasn't my experience at all. Perhaps those folks are using the Bernzomatic TS4000 rather than the 8000? Anyway, it took about two minutes to sear both sides of a steak (total). Great results. And I LOVE what this thing does to a fat cap.
Dominic Armato
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Skillet Doux wrote:Hey, Searzall people, what do you use to hold the meat you're searing? Seems like a plate would get... a little toasty. Any special setup?
M_L wrote:I just put a cooling rack or two on a half sheet.
I also use a sheet pan and a cooling rack...
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Lunchbox
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Skillet Doux wrote:Loving the Searzall so far. I see complaints about it being underpowered online, but that wasn't my experience at all. Perhaps those folks are using the Bernzomatic TS4000 rather than the 8000? Anyway, it took about two minutes to sear both sides of a steak (total). Great results. And I LOVE what this thing does to a fat cap.
Yeah imma upgrade to an 8000... It takes longer than I'd like to do a steak with my 4000... However I'm going to keep the 4000 so I can be a little more delicate when I need to... I toasted marshmallows a little too quickly over Christmas... The 4k should be great for fish, etc.
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Skillet Doux
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The 8000 has an adjustment knob. Haven't played with it yet, but I suspect the ability to turn it down will negate the need to keep two torches on hand.
Dominic Armato
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Skillet Doux wrote:The 8000 has an adjustment knob. Haven't played with it yet, but I suspect the ability to turn it down will negate the need to keep two torches on hand.
The 4000 has two settings... On. And Off. So yeah I'll be putting that up on ebay or something...
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azhotdish
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The 4000 has two settings... On. And Off. So yeah I'll be putting that up on ebay or something...
Let me know before you do because I may know someone who wants to buy it.
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Joel
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azhotdish wrote:
The 4000 has two settings... On. And Off. So yeah I'll be putting that up on ebay or something...
Let me know before you do because I may know someone who wants to buy it.
Let me know if you want me to bring it to the dog and pony show tomorrow...
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PHXeater
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I'm finally looking into dipping my toe into sous vide...but which one to get? Sansaire? Anova? Nomiku? Thinking of asking for this as a birthday present so have a couple months to obsessively research :)

ETA: I found this article (love Kenji) http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/12/sous ... anova.html but it was almost too much info!
M_L
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I have the original Nomiku and the new Anova. I think Zach might have gotten the new Nomiku model but I did not. Realize this will not be a like for like comparison as it is Gen 1 Nomiku vs Gen 2 Anova and I am guessing several of the items I like are due to refinements in the product.

In general I would say I prefer the Anova. Mostly because it does not have the giant brick power supply that sits on my counter like the Anova does. I do not notice too much difference in heating speed etc because generally I just turn it on and go back in 20-30 min to see where it is at.

The only other advantage I would give the Anova is that the way it is mounted you can raise or lower the body of the device. This allows you to use less water to make something. The minimum height for the original Nomiku is around 8+ quarts of water in my 12 quart Cambro I could probably do the Anova in 4-6. *Edit: I was slightly wrong here, due to the depth of the cambro it is pretty much the same amount of water for both devices, only that the Anova will work in much shallower containers because of its ability to move up and down in its mounting ring.*

Also the Anova is supposed to have some sort of app that will help you make cooking easy and I think it has a bluetooth radio to communicate with your phone so it can give you real time updates on your cooks. I am not certain if Gen2 Nomiku has this. Also the Nomiku is more rigorously tested than other units. I cannot remember what certification they have the others do not USL maybe but in theory but part of that extra cost is that higher level of certification and assurance of reliability.

Based on my experience I would recommend either but if you pressed me I would tell you to get the Anova. It is a bit cheaper and a bit more well polished. The Kenji article is pretty good about breaking down the differences between them all. His followup for the Gen2 Anova is pretty excellent.
http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/05/new- ... arket.html
Last edited by M_L 6 years ago, edited 1 time in total.
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Skillet Doux
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Is the Nomiku v2 out yet? I thought it was slated for this summer.
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M_L
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I just checked their Kickstarter and their last update is from March 27th and they still were working on design and tooling so you are correct they have yet to deliver Gen2. However I believe there is a code that will allow you to buy the Gen1 for 100 off so 200 total. Makes the original more attractive but I would still recommend either the Gen2 Anova or waiting for the Gen2 Nomiku.
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ScottofStrand
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The delivery has been pushed back a few times. It's currently set for June, much to my impatient dismay.
M_L
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If you have been thinking about getting the Anova Precision Cooker (the newest one I believe) it is on Amazon Gold Box deal today for 120 which is a really darn good price. It is a great machine and the app is solid. They even have a new partnership with Kenji from Serious Eats to provide content and recipes for the app specifically using the Anova.

http://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00U ... PDKIKX0DER

So you know for those of you still waiting for the new Nomiku. ;) (Too soon still?)
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ScottofStrand
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Thanks for posting that! I've been thinking about getting another Sous Vide since the Kickstarter for the new Nomiku is pushed back even further(now manufacturing won't even start until September).
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Lunchbox
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Oh man, that is tempting... $120 is a screaming deal...
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Really wish I had caught the Anova for $120 but alas, I wasn't on my PFN game. I did pull the trigger yesterday after receiving an Amazon gift card though!

Would it be crazy ambitious to start with a tri tip for a group of 15 this weekend? I may be able to test it out with a rack of lamb on just the two of us if it arrives early enough tomorrow. I guess I have a couple questions - because tri-tip is thick I was planning on EVOO, salt, pepper, for 3 hours at 133 F. After removing I was planning on adding a little more of a spice rub pre-sear on the grill (best option based on the rental we have). Would that get me a nice medium rare? Is there any real risk to it - as in do I need to check it with Thermapen still? I read one article that said to do 5-10 hours on a tri-trip but that seems a long time and I worry about the texture change Kenji warned about in his guide.

Also, no fancy setup yet, just planning on using a stock pot or dutch oven for now. Is there anything else I need to be careful about as far as water volume/height that won't be clearly spelled out when I get the Anova?
DMancini
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No pictures but just finished a 48 hour chuck roast. 136 for 48 hours with just a bit of thyme and rosemary. Finished on a mesquite grill. Pretty sure that is exactly what sous vide was invented for.
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Ok, this is stupid, stupid simple. Just need to work on my searing otherwise my sous vide was a success! I had never actually cooked lamb somehow so I don't have a true comparison but certainly didn't mess anything up.

Just pulled out the biggest pot I had, screwed in the Anova turned the dial to 132 and boom. I had filled up the pot with warm-hot water so it was already at 125 degrees. Using the water displacement method i sealed the bag where I had put some EVOO, S&P, and a little bit of rosemary. I was worried that since the rack took up a big portion of the pot the water wouldn't circulate great. I kept testing with my thermapen and it was still a perfect 132 everywhere.
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Pulled it out after 2 hours and it was not so pretty so we'll skip that picture...

Attempted to do a sear on the grill, got tons of flare ups, a bad sear, basically the only part of this process where I 100% failed...but my new partner in crime, the Anova, was perfect. I was just so worried about the grill taking away the perfect cook from the sous vide that I didn't let it get a good sear. Lesson learned. Then just let it rest for a few, cut in and...perfectly cooked. I cannot wait to do a steak with the Anova!
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As a side note, the Anova is a lot bigger than I thought it would be - from pictures I was assuming it'd be immersion blender sized. Not a big deal, just something to note.

Also, I made some potatoes with dinner and was kicking myself - I should've thrown them in the pot to see what would happen! Worst case scenario I would've had to mash them up.
M_L
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PHXeater wrote:Pulled it out after 2 hours and it was not so pretty so we'll skip that picture...

Attempted to do a sear on the grill, got tons of flare ups, a bad sear, basically the only part of this process where I 100% failed...but my new partner in crime, the Anova, was perfect. I was just so worried about the grill taking away the perfect cook from the sous vide that I didn't let it get a good sear. Lesson learned.
FYI Searzall will make your life better.
PHXeater wrote:Then just let it rest for a few, cut in and...perfectly cooked.
From what I have read and at least in my experience resting is not really needed when cooking sous vide. I am probably wrong but I have not noticed a difference other than it has started to get cold. But feel free to not take my word, here is what Kenji says:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/06/food ... html#rest?

Also nice work. I have not tried much other than steak, pork chops, salmon, chicken, and veggie sides. Perhaps I will need to stretch out a bit and try something more drastic.