Sous Vide Cookery at Home

Cooking at home and sourcing ingredients
PHXeater
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3 years ago

I know this isn't the fanciest sous vide accomplishment out there but at my house I often cook up a couple extra chicken breasts with dinner to throw in salads, soups, snack on, etc. The problem always being reheating them when not going in a cold dish. Well, I've been loving the Anova to do so. Keeps all the moisture in, no rubbery texture. Is it exactly as good as first cooking? No. But typically i'm just tossing them on top of a pasta or stir fry (or rice bowl with TJ's frozen brown rice when I'm really lazy) and not trying to create 5 star cuisine. Best part is if I had a good sear first time cooking, and am just slicing up the chicken, the texture is still great! No need to re-sear or anything.

Still making the best pork tenderloins of my life in the thing as well, problem is everyone but me keeps freaking out when the meat shows a tiny bit of pink :x
M_L
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3 years ago

Nice work Liz! I got a bit carried away as I now have the wireless Anova. I went and got a WeMo switch. I can turn the switch on remotely from work and then set my anova to heat up remotely as well. So I can be at work, turn them both on and have the water pre-heated by the time I get home.
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ScottofStrand
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Location: Mesa, AZ

3 years ago

I finally got my new Wifi Nomiku in the mail. Looking forward to putting it thru its paces!
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Lunchbox
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3 years ago

ScottofStrand wrote:I finally got my new Wifi Nomiku in the mail. Looking forward to putting it thru its paces!
Jealous. Haven't gotten mine yet.
-- LBX

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artvandelay
Posts: 147
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3 years ago

Jealous. Haven't gotten mine yet.
Yo're not alone. Still waiting for mine as well.
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Lunchbox
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3 years ago

Kenji blew me away with this one... Great read on how to Sous Vide sausages...

http://www.seriouseats.com/2016/02/the- ... usage.html
-- LBX

Instagram: @zachary.garcia

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PHXeater
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3 years ago

Any tips on cooking a rump roast? I bought a 2lb one today because: cheap red meat. Isn't that what sous vide is great for? But, after doing some research I see some widely varying comments on how long to cook it. I've seen suggestions of 24-48 hours and it comes out like prime rib but that seems excessive. Other websites say 6-8 hours from 135-140F for medium rare but I don't consider 140F medium rare so I'm also giving a side eye to that suggestion.

Help?
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Lunchbox
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3 years ago

PHXeater wrote:Any tips on cooking a rump roast? I bought a 2lb one today because: cheap red meat. Isn't that what sous vide is great for? But, after doing some research I see some widely varying comments on how long to cook it. I've seen suggestions of 24-48 hours and it comes out like prime rib but that seems excessive. Other websites say 6-8 hours from 135-140F for medium rare but I don't consider 140F medium rare so I'm also giving a side eye to that suggestion.

Help?
I've never cooked one but that said it's like any other red meat IMO... The longer you cook it the more the tissues break down and tender it will be... If you check out Kenji's sous vide steak primer there's a really good image that illustrates what happens the longer you cook it... (Image Link)

Full article here:
http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/06/food ... steak.html

Anyway it's going to be a matter of personal preference for the most part. Any of the above temps will cook the meat and if you're talking a few hours minimum then you're good from a safety perspective. I know this is vague advice but it's the best I can offer... :)
-- LBX

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PHXeater
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3 years ago

I ended up doing 6 hours at 133 and it was just OK. I should've done an au jus with the broth in the bag and didn't. It wasn't bad but certainly wasn't super flavorful, for the price I really can't complain though. I do prefer my red meat on the bottom range of medium rare which may have been part of my disappointment but was concerned with food safety and didn't risk it.
artvandelay
Posts: 147
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3 years ago

Got my Nomiku in the mail this week. Did a very basic test run tonight with a ribeye at 133. I held it for a little over two hours and then seared it on all sides in a screaming hot cast iron pan. Searing took about a minute per side to get some nice color (still managed to smoke up the house nicely). Steak was perfectly cooked all the way through. Really looking forward to playing with this some more.
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Tim H
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3 years ago

Congrats, Art! I'm still plugging away with a first gen Anova and have become a big fan of sous vide.

First off, I finally cooked a chicken breast sous vide at 145°F for about an hour. I put each breast in a small ziploc sandwich bag for cooking, then chilled them, sliced them thin, and then doused them with the sauce from Fuchsia Dunlop's Every Grain of Rice recipe for Cold Chicken witha Spicy Sichuanese Sauce (pg. 48). Honestly, the chicken breast was so tender and juicy it was almost a shame to slam it with that sauce. But not really. Because that sauce is awesome.

The next day, it occurred to me that the temp was almost low enough to cook the famous 60°C egg, so I cooked some eggs at 142°F (slightly higher than 60) for an hour and put one on some fried rice. Nice, but I think I prefer a standard poached egg.
62_egg.jpg
145°F chicken breast, 142°F egg
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Also cooked some "roast" beef (Costco labeled it a round tip roast cap) at 131°F for 7 hours. A lot of recipes on the Web called for 24 or 48 cook times, which seems crazy to me for a lean cut of beef. Since there's not a lot of fat, I think just getting it up to temp is all that's needed. At any rate, I was happy with it. It had a bit of that slow roast prime rib flavor. I did not bother to sear it, just chilled it and sliced for sandwiches on the meat slicer. Got eight big sandwiches out of that bad boy.
beef_dip.jpg
Beef dip sandwich (the dip was still on the stove)
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Finally, I've kept my vow to make only sous vide burgers, and I like them more and more. I find that the bigger the burger, the more sous vide pays off, so I do a full half-pound pub-style burger of 80/20 ground chuck with a quick sear in a smoking hot cast iron pan. Again, I just use a ziploc sandwich bag for each burger. Also at 131°F for just over an hour.
halfpound_burger.jpg
Half-pound 131 burger
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There is nothing either good or bad but gravy makes it so. - Kevin Hearne
artvandelay
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3 years ago

Thanks. Those look fantastic. Did you sear the chicken breasts? Wondering the best way to do chicken breasts. Not exactly a fan but they fill my healthy eating quota that keeps increasing as I get older.
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Tim H
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Location: Gilbert, AZ

3 years ago

artvandelay wrote:Did you sear the chicken breasts? Wondering the best way to do chicken breasts. Not exactly a fan but they fill my healthy eating quota that keeps increasing as I get older.
No sear on the chicken breasts. Didn't feel it necessary given the massively flavorful sauce I was hitting them with. You know, I haven't bought a chicken breast in years (just thighs), but cooking the breasts sous vide changed my mind about them. (I'm sure a great cook can make them amazing any old way, but I usually ended up with dry breasts for fear of undercooking them.)

If you are serving whole chicken breasts, you might want to give them a quick sear for some extra flavor. But even so, I like the idea of just saucing them up and not bothering with the sear.
There is nothing either good or bad but gravy makes it so. - Kevin Hearne
M_L
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3 years ago

I sear mine when I am making Halal Cart Chicken and Rice because I want that texture. Be careful not to overcook them when you are searing them.

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GoBlue18
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3 years ago

I definitely dig sous vide burgers. I usually finish searing them in either butter or peanut oil, depending on flavor or "crunch" I want from the outside.
M_L
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3 years ago

GoBlue18 wrote:I definitely dig sous vide burgers. I usually finish searing them in either butter or peanut oil, depending on flavor or "crunch" I want from the outside.
I usually just brush mine with butter and hit them with the Searzall.
PHXeater
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3 years ago

As far as searing chicken breasts - I do a pre-cook sear as well. I find the shape is just a little odd from the bag if I put it in raw. If you're just slicing it up after cooking it's fine of course, but if serving whole a little on the weird side.

And agreed on chicken breasts being very meh typically but I really like them with the sous vide!
kenberg
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3 years ago

I have had great results with the velveted chicken piccata recipe from the late, lamented SVKitchen site. Velveting is one way to deal with the pasty look of SV chicken.

A copy of what he had posted a few years ago can still be found via the Web Archive site at

http://web.archive.org/web/201509202049 ... om/?p=4674

- Ken
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Tim H
Posts: 281
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Location: Gilbert, AZ

3 years ago

Cooked a boneless leg of lamb (5.5 lbs) sous vide at 131°F for six hours. Used the spice mixture (but not cooking instructions) from Yotam Ottolenghi's Jerusalem Lamb Shawarma recipe. I did make a sandwich, but the best bits were right off the cutting board with salt and olive oil. Very tasty.

I finished the lamb over very hot coals about three minutes per side. Got pretty bad flare ups on the fatty side, but just decided to live with it get some char. Might be wiser to finish this in a hot oven or with a searzall.
JerusalemLamb.jpg
131 boneless leg of lamb
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LambShawarma.jpg
Lamb shawarma (or maybe more of gyro)
LambShawarma.jpg (63.39 KiB) Viewed 1846 times
There is nothing either good or bad but gravy makes it so. - Kevin Hearne
artvandelay
Posts: 147
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3 years ago

Planning to SV a tri-tip on Monday. Logistically I think I need to SV it at home and then finish searing it on the grill somewhere else. Has anyone done something similar where they have taken steak out of the water and then wait an hour or two before searing and serving? If so, can I hold at room temperature or should I refrigerate it?
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